Prof. Tibor Richard Machan

Quick Facts

220px-TiborMachan_Italy06Born: 03/18/1939, Budapest, Hungary
Died: 03/24/2016, Santiago Canyon, California
Spouse: Mrs. Marty Zupan (ex)
Number of children: 3

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibor_R_Machan

In Hungary
Education: Budapest, left prior to graduation
Occupation: Student
Active role in the revolution: NO

In United States of America
Arrival: 1953, Cleveland
Education: UC Santa Barbara (Ph.D. 1971)
New York University (MA 1966)
Claremont McKenna College (BA 1965)
Occupation: Professor of Contemporary Philosophy, Western Region
Workplace: Chapman College, Orange, California

Awards: Tibor Richard Machan (/ˈtiːbɔːr məˈkæn/; 18 March 1939 – 24 March 2016) was a Hungarian American philosopher. A professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Auburn University, Machan held the R. C. Hoiles Chair of Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business & Economics at Chapman University in Orange, California until December 31, 2014.

He was a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, a research fellow at the Independent Institute, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and an adjunct faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute.[1] Machan was a syndicated and freelance columnist; author of more than one hundred scholarly papers and more than forty books, among them Why is Everyone Else Wrong? (Springer, 2008). He was, until spring 2015, senior contributing editor atThe Daily Bell. He was senior fellow at the Heartland Institute in Arlington Heights, Illinois.


Tibor Richard Machan (/ˈtiːbɔːr məˈkæn/; 18 March 1939 – 24 March 2016) was a Hungarian American philosopher. A professor emeritus in the department of philosophy at Auburn University, Machan held the R. C. Hoiles Chair of Business Ethics and Free Enterprise at the Argyros School of Business & Economics at Chapman University in Orange, California until December 31, 2014.
He was a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, a research fellow at the Independent Institute, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and an adjunct faculty member of the Ludwig von Mises Institute. Machan was a syndicated and freelance columnist; author of more than one hundred scholarly papers and more than forty books, among them Why is Everyone Else Wrong? (Springer, 2008). He was, until spring 2015, senior contributing editor at The Daily Bell. He was senior fellow at the Heartland Institute in Arlington Heights, Illinois.
Though he could have been broadly classified as a libertarian on many important issues, Machan rejected any division of libertarianism into left wing and right wing. He held that, by its nature, libertarianism is about political liberty for all individuals to do whatever is peaceful and non-aggressive. Machan was a minarchist.

Life
Machan was born in Budapest.[2] Machan’s father hired a smuggler to get him out of Hungary when he was 14 years of age and he came to the United States three years later, in 1956.[3] By 1965, Machan graduated Claremont McKenna College (then Claremont Men’s College).[4] He took his Masters of Arts in Philosophy at New York University from 1965 to 1966, and his Ph.D in Philosophy at University of California, Santa Barbara, 1966–1971. In 1970, with Robert W. Poole, Jr. and Manuel Klausner, he purchased Reason magazine, which has since become the leading libertarian periodical in America. Machan edited Reason for two years and was the editor of Reason Papers, an annual journal of interdisciplinary normative studies, for 25 years.
He was a visiting professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1992–1993 and taught at universities in California, New York, Switzerland, and Alabama. He lectured in Europe, South Africa, New Zealand, Budapest, Hungary, Prague, Czech Republic, Azerbaijan, Republic of Georgia, Armenia, and Latin America on business ethics and political philosophy.
He sat on the advisory boards for several foundations and think tanks, and served on the founding Board of the Jacob J. Javits Graduate Fellowship Program of the U. S. Department of Education. Machan was selected as the 2003 President of the American Society for Value Inquiry, and delivered the presidential address on December 29, 2002, in Philadelphia, at the Eastern Division meetings of the American Philosophical Association, titled “Aristotle & Business.” He was on the board of the Association for Private Enterprise Education for several terms.
Machan was an adviser to Freedom Communications, Inc. on libertarian issues from 1996 to 2014.
Machine wrote a memoir, The Man Without a Hobby: Adventures of a Gregarious Egoist (Hamilton Books, 2004; 2nd edition 2012). On 24 March 2015, he died at the age of 77.

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