Dr. Bulcsu Veress

Quick Facts

VeressBulcsuVB1Born: 07/26/1941, Budapest
Died: 11/20/2012, Washington, DC

Source: www.hhrf.org/veressbulcsu/

In Hungary
Education: Petofi Gimnazium, Buda
Eotvos Lorand University of Sciences International Law, discovered by the Secret Police and rejected from the School. Jailed. Released early as juvenile.
Sent to the University of Strasbourg for post graduate work in comparative studies in international law. In 1970 Decided to stay in the West.
Occupation: Lawyer, University Law Assistant Prof.
Active role in the revolution: YES

As a teenager and driven by curiosity, he wondered around the city, witnessing book burnings, people shot and laying in the streets, the battle at Vermezo, the cessation of fighting, breadlines, new atrocities after the reoccupation in November.

In United States of America
Arrival: 1971, New York
Education: Columbia University, earned his third degree in Political Science, International Affairs, 1976
Occupation: Legislative Assistant, Consultant, founder Committee for Human Rights in Rumania
Workplace: Foreign Relations Committee, Washington, District of Columbia

Awards: Member of Sen. Dodd’s reelection campaign, worked with Sen. Dodd to the end of 1991. Sent by the State Department to Budapest in 1991 to consult the Hungarian Parliament on changing the system to a democracy after the 1981 turn of events.


Dr. Bulcsu Veress was born in 1941, in Budapest from educated parents who were of Szekler, Rumania at that time, heritage. They lived on Attila Ut, across from Vermezo Ter. His early reading interests, due to the lack of other sources, was the publication of DISZ (Democratic – read Communist – Young People’s Coalition), which decidedly turned its interest to the happenings in the West before the Revolution, which took everyone by surprise.
As a teenager and driven by curiosity, he wondered around the city, witnessing book burnings, people shot and laying in the streets, the battle at Vermezo, the cessation of fighting, breadlines, new atrocities after the reoccupation in November.
Bulcsu was accepted at the Eotwos Lorant University of Sciences, Law. After his imprisonment and release, being an exceptionally bright young man, he was sent for post-graduate studies in comparative and international law to the University of Strasbourg, and in 1970, he decided not to return to Hungary. He emigrated to the United States in 1971. The same year, he was admitted to the Graduate School of Columbia University in New York , where he received a degree (his third) in political science/international relations in 1976.
Bulcsú threw his energies into the work of the New York-based Committee for Human Rights in Rumania (later Hungarian Human Rights Foundation). With HHRF, he regularly traveled to Washington D.C. to lobby Congress on behalf of the Hungarian minority in Romania. In 1980, he joined the campaign to elect Christopher Dodd of Connecticut to the U.S. Senate. After Dodd’s election, Bulcsú worked for many years as Senator Dodd’s Legislative Assistant, serving on the Foreign Relations Committee. On Capitol Hill, he became known among U.S. lawmakers as an expert scholar on minority rights issues and a credible political analyst of Communist societies and their leadership. With his thorough understanding of U.S. politics and the inner workings of Congress, Bulcsú was an invaluable resource for HHRF and other Hungarian-American efforts to influence U.S. government policy on East Central Europe. Bulcsú was the originator of HHRF’s ultimately successful strategy of using the Jackson-Vanik amendment to pressure Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu on human and minority rights in Romania. He was also an accomplished interpreter and translator.
At the end of 1991, Bulcsú returned to Hungary and served as advisor to the newly democratic Parliament of Hungary. Later, he worked as advisor to Hungary’s foreign minister and as editor and consultant at Duna Television.
After moving back to Washington DC in 1999, he stayed on as political consultant to Sen. Dodd, advising him on the Helsinki Accord.

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